New free audiobook: a 1930’s whodunit

Want a brief escape from hectic or humdrum everyday life? This book will help. A classic whodunit from the ‘Golden Age of Detective novels’. A 1930’s airfield with small (open cockpit) airplanes and glamorous aviators. A flying instructor does not survive a plane crash in full view of witnesses from the airfield. Tragic accident? Of course there’s more than meets the eye. The police soon have their hands full. More info see below.

It was fun to record – a big thanks to Erin for ‘proof-listening’, and Hokuspokus & Viktor for the cataloguing.

Death of an Airman by Christopher St John Sprigg (1907-1937), published 1934.

deathairman

Experienced flight instructor George Furnace dies in a plane crash near the airfield, in full view of witnesses. The verdict at the inquest is ‘death by misadventure’. But an Australian bishop, who had signed up for flying lessons just before the incident, starts to question this. Could it have been murder? Or suicide? It takes some persistent work by police detectives Creighton and Bray, that takes them all over the UK and to France, to unravel the whole story.
Author Christopher St John Sprigg, also known under his pseudonym Christopher Caudwell (1907-1937) had a passion for aviation; he had previously published two beginners textbooks on the art of flying, so presumably he got his details right. Famous crime fiction novelist Dorothy L. Sayers wrote a glowing review for this novel at the time. (Summary by Anna Simon)

Recorded for Legamus – book first published in 1934. Copyright expired (so download is legal) in Europe, Canada, Australia and more countries (in other countries, please check copyright laws).

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